Category Archives: March – Articles

Anchovies

Despite their tiny size, cured anchovies make a tremendous contribution to the taste of a dish making them especially valuable in meat-free dishes although not, of course, for strict vegetarians. Read on

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Trifle

There are many different types of trifle recipes. If you grew up with the version that contained tinned fruit, packet custard and was sprinkled with hundreds and thousands, you might be surprised to know that it is actually an ancient and venerable dish. Read on

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Real Chocolate

There has been a real growth in understanding about the difference between quality chocolate and mass-produced poseurs so make sure that this Easter you taste the best. Read on

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Learning to Love Cabbage

At this time of year, when we are still eagerly awaiting the first new vegetables of spring, having plenty of ideas for using good old standbys like cabbage. The way it is prepared, and cooking without water, are key to enjoying this vegetable. Read on

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Herb of the Month – Thyme

I’ve chosen thyme as this month’s herb because although there are some new arrivals as the weather warms up, e.g. chives and sorrel, they are unlikely to be large enough to pick until April. With luck, and as the Queen of Herbs, Jekka McVicar observes, “providing you are not too greedy”, you can pick fresh thyme all year round. Read on

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Back to the future for Grain?

From the days when Britain was the granary of the Roman Empire we have moved to a time when our modern wheat makes some people sick. Could the past hold the answer to our future as far as grain production is concerned? Suzanne Wynn begins an exploration of our native grains beginning with Spelt. Read on

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Take Time to make Good Bread

The Chorleywood Bread-making Process, developed in 1961, cut bread fermentation time from three hours to about as many minutes. But for the home cook there are many benefits to long fermentation, which Suzanne Wynn argues are as relevant to sweet enriched doughs as they are for your daily loaf. Read on

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The Great British Banger

Sausages are a much loved part of our British Food Heritage and a good way for producers to add value to their basic product. Suzanne share her tips for making the best sausages. Read on

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THE ABSOLUTE IMPORTANCE OF UPLAND MUTTON

In the Middle Ages Britain’s wealth was founded on the wool trade and even today we have far more sheep than any other country in Europe. We have 40 native pure breeds, more than any other country in the world, which are ideally suited to the terrain where they first evolved. There are also 12 recognised crossbreeds, accounting for about 40 per cent of the national flock. Sheep play a vital role in managing the countryside, much of which depends on grazing, but 70 per cent of the sheep meat produced in the UK now comes from lowland sheep, even though this is land that is most likely to be suited to other forms of agriculture. Suzanne Wynn describes a traditional way to eat like a prince and help solve the world’s food problems all at the same time. Read on

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