What happens after Covid-19?

4 thoughts on “What happens after Covid-19?

  1. I am re-reading Good Food for Everyone Forever and I’m sure you would not change much if you wrote it today. Some of it was prophetic -esp. predicting new pandemics from our increased contact with nature.
    I recently attended a farming conference at the Agriculture Department here in Reading and was mightily depressed by how little concern there was to face up to the big issues of the day. If this is what the next generation of farmers are being taught heaven help us.
    However there are some good signs on the horizon. My wife is reading Isabella Tree’s wonderful book Wilding and while Knepp may be an outlier, their principles of working with rather than against nature needs to be incorporated in all our farming practices.
    I worry about food and cooking a lot. So much of what we read and see (on the seemingly endless TV cookery programmes) seems to depend on fancy imported foods rather than making use of what we do or could produce here. I once floated and idea to the Newbury Show that they should organise a competition among restaurants to produce menus that were made up of ingredients sourced only from within the county. Maybe time is right for that again to help the battered restaurant industry to find a new role, life, and purpose when we have all forgotten that they ever existed.
    Keep up the good work.

  2. Dear Joe
    Many thanks for your comment.
    I absolutely agree with you re food and cooking. Enlightened Agriculture aka Real Farming is as you know defined as “Agriculture that is expressly designed to provide food of the highest quality nutritionally and gastronomically to everyone, everywhere, without wrecking the rest of the world” – and if we apply the principles of agroecology this should be eminently possible. But enlightened, agroecological farmers cannot survive unless people at large are prepared to buy their stuff. So Enlightened Ag needs a corresponding food culture – cookery and food habits geared to what enlightened farmers produce. This ought to be remarkably easy to achieve. After all, agroecological farming focuses on arable farming and horticulture, with ruminants raised primarily or exclusively on pasture (which should be as natural as possible) and pigs and pasture raised mainly on leftovers (swill) and surpluses; all of it produced as far as possible on mixed farms that generally are small to medium-sized. Such farms would produce “plenty of plants, not much meat, and maximum variety”. These nine words encapsulate the most plausible nutritional theory of the past 60 years – and also describe the general shape of all the world’s greatest cooking. That is: all the great cuisines on an axis from Italy to China make only sparing use of meat – as a garnish, as stock, and just for the occasional feast.
    Ie all we really need to do is re-learn how to cook and emulate the world’s best traditional cooking (as indeed the best chefs emphasize!),
    This is why we are calling out new college “the College for Real Farming and Food Culture”.
    All we need is a lot more money to bring together the people needed to make it all happen. We know who they are but cannot afford their salaries.
    All best wishes
    CT

  3. Stellar sense Colin! Thank you ~ as always; cogent, coherent, concise and eminently quotable. Brilliantly lucid and beautifully written; ticks every sensible box.

    If only more people could share and enjoy the splendid maturity of your superb eloquence. I look forward to the forthcoming book; in the meantime I’ll post a link to this on my Facebook timeline ~ who knows…maybe a few sane souls will avail themselves gladly of the opportunity to bask in the warm glow of your most enviable, genial & altogether roseate understanding.

    Kindest and best to you and Ruth and all the brave souls that comprise and support the ORFC ~ from N Devon

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